horror, women in horror, writing

Mythology & Me: Julia Benally

Hi! I’m Julia, born to the Bear Clan of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. I love to write horror strictly at high noon. I dabble in fantasy, thrillers, and sometimes I’ll write a romance if I’ve hit my head. I’ve had somewhere around two dozen publications and am greedy for more. I enjoy freaky stories that send chills up my spine, and especially love hearing big foot tales. Follow my blog for more fun, updates on upcoming works, and the stories I’ve written. Some of them are free. You can also follow me on twitter and facebook.

And you can also buy my book! Book two is coming out this year, so you need to read the first one before it does! and mark it to read on goodreads!

I’m so excited and thrilled to be collaborating in Women In Horror Month with the talented Iseult Murphy, who can write like a boss.


Q.1: What do you love most about mythology?

The thing I love most is probably the monsters in rural areas. There is something exciting and freaky about creatures lurking in the nearby forests, still terrorizing people no matter what century it is, or how much technology there is. No matter how advanced people are, these things still retain their power.

Q.2: When did you first get interested in mythology?

I’ve been interested in monsters since I was a little girl. Inventing a monster always made for a good game. In my teen years, my family regaled one another with terror stories, especially those from the reservation. Sometimes, I would listen in when I wasn’t supposed and not sleep that night. My family members had a turn for narrative, so they always rendered each story interesting and gripping. At school, I would seek out people to tell me more stories. Not everybody wanted to share, but once everybody started sharing, people would want to see whose story was better than whose. Those sessions got extremely freaky.

Q.3: Why do you think mythology and horror go hand in hand?

I would say they’re both scary and send chills up the spine. Mythology makes a different kind of horror from the queasy ones, or torture porn. Mythology makes horror interesting. Something that can reach out and touch modern day is always terrifying.

Q.4: How do you think mythology and horror are relevant in the modern age?

Lots of people seem to have forgotten about the past. Their heads are stuck in their phones. They live in a VR world where they argue about asinine things that everybody forgets the next day. Horror gives them a pinch. Horror makes them remember they’re alive, because of the fear it invokes. Good horror reminds them there is a frightening world out there and they should face it, not slink into a corner and let it pass by. Mythology comes from the past. Like I said before, it reaches out and shouts, “I’m still here. And I won’t let you forget me, no matter how far you sink into your VR world. I can still get you, and this time, you won’t be watching.”

Q.5: Where do you think horror will lead mythology in the future?

It will probably lead it off to new ideas and new ways of depicting it. Some will be stupider than others, but mythology will still be there, evolving or devolving. New monsters will arise and try to join the ranks of the old, if they can prove themselves timeless.


Thank you so much, Julia, for taking part in this new series. It was so much fun working with you on this post.

Want to find out what Julia asked me and how I answered? Find out on her blog post, here!


Look out for my review of Julia’s fascinating dark fantasy, Pariahs, next month, as well as an interview with her.

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